Historical Significance The Newsome House Museum is the restored home of the Joseph Thomas Newsome family. Newsome (1869-1942), an attorney, established a law practice in Newport News and prospered as a member of the postbellum south's new, urban…

Historical Significance Following the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, 800 African-American churchgoers who worshiped in the balcony of the white First Baptist Church of Charlottesville on Park Avenue petitioned to form their own congregation.…

Historical Significance First organized as Wesley Zion Church and later called Little Zion Church, Lomax AME Zion Church was originally established in Freedman's Village in 1866. The church was relocated to Nauck, Arlington County in 1874. A church…

Historical Significance Located in Cappahosic on the York River, Holly Knoll was the retirement home of Dr. Robert Russa Moton. Moton was born in 1867 and graduated from the Hampton Institute in 1890. In 1935, after serving for twenty years as…

Historical Significance Education was a gateway through which African Americans could secure opportunity in a segregated society. It is not surprising then that the two original anchors of Danville's Holbrook-Ross neighborhood were the Danville…

Historical Significance On April 1, 1868, Brigadier General Samuel Armstrong (Superintendent of the Freedmen's Bureau of the Ninth District of Virginia) opened Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute to serve the growing community of freed people…

Historical Significance The Gillfield Baptist Church is the second oldest African-American church in Petersburg and one of the oldest in the country. Its record book is one of the oldest, preserved handwritten record books in an American black…

Historical Significance Despite the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka decision that declared racial segregation in schools unconstitutional, Virginia school boards adopted a policy of "massive resistance," avoiding integration by whatever…

Historical Significance The First Baptist Church congregation was organized in 1774 and is the oldest Black Baptist Church in America. The church has a long history of providing social services to the community. It housed the first school for blacks…

Historical Significance In 1873 the Daughters of Zion, an all female African-American society, created a two-acre independent plot across from the Oakwood Cemetery (the second oldest public cemetery in Charlottesville). The Daughters of Zion…