Historical Significance Pamplin Historical Park preserves a portion of the Tudor Hall Plantation, circa 1812, including the plantation home and reconstructed outbuildings and slave quarters. The Tudor Hall Plantation is the former home of the…

Historical Significance Black fraternal orders like the Odd Fellows (and similar organizations for women) were popular during the 19th century as places where blacks could hone their business and economic skills, as well as socialize. White Odd…

Historical Significance Oakland Baptist Church, still an active congregation, was founded in 1891 by African-Americans living in the Fort, a village formed on the site of the dismantled Civil War-era Fort Ward. The church was an outgrowth of the Oak…

Historical Significance One of a few relics of pre-Civil War black entrepreneurship surviving in rural Virginia, the Madden Tavern was completed in 1840, owned and operated by a free black man, Willis Madden (1800-1879). In the 19th century, free…

Historical Significance After the Bureau for Colored Troops was established in May 1863, African-American troops began training for front line duty in the Civil War at camps around Alexandria. Although there were already several hospitals for white…

Historical Significance The site of the Hanover County Black Heritage Society was once the St. George Tucker Male Academy at Ashland (circa 1858). Tucker organized the Ashland Grays during the Civil War and fought in the Battle of Malvern Hill in…

Historical Significance One of the nation's largest slave trading firms, Franklin & Armfield operated from this townhouse on Duke Street from 1828-1836. Enslaved African Americans awaiting shipment to slave markets in New Orleans and Natchez…

Historical Significance Thousands of "contrabands" - Southern slaves liberated by Union forces during the Civil War - helped build the necklace of 68 earthen forts and 93 batteries known as the Defenses of Washington, of which Fort Ward was one of…

Fort Monroe is located at Old Point Comfort (now Hampton, Virginia), where two British privateer ships carrying the first "20-odd" Angolan Africans to Virginia entered the colony in August 1619. The Portuguese, who were waging war in Africa,…

Historical Significance Emily Howland, a New York Quaker and abolitionist, taught in a Freedmen's camp during the Civil War. After the war ended, she was disappointed to find that Freedmen were not in fact receiving the "40 acres and a mule"…