Historical Significance In 1949, the Charlottesville School Board combined Jefferson High School, Esmont High School, and Albemarle Training School, black high schools in Charlottesville and Albemarle County, into a single high school for all the…

Historical Significance By 1915, only 1,761 black pupils were enrolled in Virginia high schools, compared to 23,184 white pupils. Lucy Addison was the first principal of Harrison School, constructed in 1916 as the first public secondary school for…

The Greensville County Training School began in 1900 as a small three-room, wood-frame schoolhouse, led by three teachers: Georgia Kelly, Rev. J.H. Waller, and Principal Edward W. Wyatt. In 1912, a widow named Lucy Magee sold two acres of land,…

Historical Significance Despite the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka decision that declared racial segregation in schools unconstitutional, Virginia school boards adopted a policy of "massive resistance," avoiding integration by whatever…

Historical Significance In 1924,The Jeanes Fund, a one-million-dollar national fund donated by Miss Anna T. Jeanes, a Quaker from Philadelphia, allowed Loudoun County to hire a superintendent for Negro schools. The county did not do so until 1931,…

Historical Significance Before 1959, African-American students in Botetourt attended one of the county’s several small all-black schools, such as Botetourt Training School, Eagle Rock Elementary, or Blue Ridge Elementary. While these schools…

Historical Significance The Carver-Price High School was named in honor of two notable African Americans: George Washington Carver and the locally known Mozella Price. Mozella Jordan Price supervised African-American schools in Appomattox County…

Historical Significance Formerly a plantation owned by Philip St. George Cocke, son of General John Hartwell Cocke of Bremo, Belmead was purchased in 1893 by Colonel and Mrs. Edward de Vaux Morrell of Philadelphia to establish a school for…