Historical Significance Lumpkin's Jail was located on a half an acre of land in what is now Richmond's historic Shockoe Bottom. The jail was known as "The Devil's Half Acre" because it was a holding pen, punishment and "breaking" center for more…

Historical Significance After the Bureau for Colored Troops was established in May 1863, African-American troops began training for front line duty in the Civil War at camps around Alexandria. Although there were already several hospitals for white…

Historical Significance Catherine "Kitty" Foster's home was located across from the University of Virginia in a community of free blacks called Canada. Canada was established in the 19th century, in part to provide laborers and domestics for the…

Historical Significance On the morning of October 17, 1859, Heywood Shepherd, a baggage master for the Winchester and Potomac Railroad at Harpers Ferry, walked onto the tracks to prepare for an eastbound train. He did not know that John Brown's band…

Historical Significance In 1820, free black laundress Hannah Jackson bought a house and lot from Quaker landlord Mordecai Miller. Her purchase, for 5 shillings and regular ground rent, made her one of the first African Americans to own property in…

Historical Significance Gum Springs, an African-American community, was originally founded by slaves who were set free when George Washington's wife Martha died at Mount Vernon. Under the leadership of freed slave West Ford, the community of Free…

Historical Significance On the first day of September, 1663, a group of white indentured servants (held for several years of service), African slaves, and Virginia Indians in the Poropotank River and Purtan Bay region of Gloucester County met to…

Historical Significance In May 1863, the U.S. government established the Freedman's Village across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., to help address the needs of the growing number of individuals who had escaped slavery in the south during…

Historical Significance Free State was an African-American community in Albemarle County located on a 220-acre parcel of land purchased by a free woman of color, Amy Bowles Farrow, in 1788. In the early 1800s Amy's son Zachariah married Critta…

Historical Significance Early education for African Americans in Harrisonburg in the late 19th century was supported by the Freedman's Bureau, United States Christian Commission, and African American teachers from the North. The first public…